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Culinary Uses for Horseradish

Harness the potently flavored horseradish for a plethora of uses in the kitchen, from salad leaves to a horseradish cheese spread.

| Winter 2018

  • Enjoy horseradish in homemade vegetable juices, soups, sauces, salads, and more.
    Photo by Getty Images/iStockphoto

Question: I’ve been harvesting horseradish root all winter, but I’m running out of things to do with it. Beyond pureeing it as a spicy garnish, what else can you do with horseradish? 

Answer: I like to buy a bottle of cheap, unflavored grain alcohol and add a few slices of horseradish root to it. I combine the infused alcohol with my home-canned vegetable juice to make an amazing bloody mary. I also like to cut the roots into thin slices and dry them just to chew on now and then, or to add to soups and sauces. Ground horseradish is fantastic in my venison jerky marinades, or for an extra kick in the homemade sausages I smoke.

Some people like to eat young, tender horseradish leaves in salads. Many people love horseradish and ketchup mixed together for a homemade cocktail sauce, while others like a big dollop on freshly roasted beef and steaks. Lots of people add thin shavings of horseradish to salads and wraps for extra flavor. I always like adding horseradish “wasabi” on my sushi when I’m eating out.

Each holiday season, my wife makes her famous horseradish cheese spread that our kids’ teachers and our holiday guests crave. I’ve also begun experimenting with my own blended horseradish mustard for grilled brats. Some people pickle horseradish, while others add fresh horseradish chunks or shreds to other pickled items, such as dill pickles and beets. These are just a few ideas.



-- Jason Herbert, teacher and homesteader who runs a farm with his family


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