Yes, we are here!

At MOTHER EARTH GARDENER and MOTHER EARTH NEWS, we have been educating folks about the benefits of self-reliance for 50 years. That includes researching and sourcing the best books and products to help individuals master the skills they need in times like these and beyond. Our online store is open and we are here to answer any questions you might have. Our customer service staff is available Monday through Friday from 8a.m.-5p.m. CDT. We can be reached at 1-800-456-5835 or by email. Stay safe!


Rose Water Recipe

Delightful rose water can be a flavorful culinary addition, a great base for beauty products, or a natural freshener for air and linens.



Spring 2017

  • To make rose water, first place a bowl upside down in a very large saucepan or pot.
    Photo by Emily Han and Gregory Han
  • Place rose petals around the upside-down bowl.
    Photo by Emily Han and Gregory Han
  • After you've placed the rose petals around the upside-down bowl, place another bowl, such as a heat-safe glass measuring cup, right-side up, on top.
    Photo by Emily Han and Gregory Han
  • Placing ice cubes on the top of the pot as it simmers creates rose-infused condensation, which will collect in the bowl inside of the pot.
    Photo by Emily Han and Gregory Han

Total Hands-On Time: 1 hr 45 min

Preparation Time: 15 min

Cook Time: 1 hr 30 min

Yield: 1 cup

For more, see: Recipes to Use Spring Blooms.

Fragrant Rose Water

Roses aren’t just beautiful to look at — they can also be used to make delightful, delicious rose water. It appears in Middle Eastern, Indian, and Chinese cuisines in ice cream, cakes, baklava, and marzipan, and rose water can also flavor lemonade, sodas, shrubs, or cocktails. Also called a “hydrosol,” this aromatic floral water can be added to the base of homemade lotion, sprayed on linens to refresh the scent, or used as a natural air freshener.

Making your own rose water is easy, and it will last for months in the fridge. Find the most fragrant roses possible, and, of course, make sure they’re free of toxic pesticides. (If you use store-bought roses, make sure they’re intended for culinary use.) Try this recipe with other fresh flowers and herbs, such as orange blossoms, lemon balm, or lavender.

For this recipe, use a lidded saucepan with about a 12-quart capacity and a convex lid (a glass lid is ideal for seeing what’s going on inside the pot). You’ll also need two small and sturdy heat-safe bowls, such as ramekins, ceramic bowls, or glass bowls. If you have one, a heat-safe glass measuring cup works well for the second bowl.


Become a Preferred Subscriber and start enjoying the benefits today!

Fall in love with the flavor, versatility, and beauty of Mother Earth Gardener

Mother Earth GardenerDelight your taste buds, mind and eyes with beautiful photos and inspirational techniques on everything you need to know to grow, preserve and cook your own heirloom fruits and vegetables. You won’t want to miss the stories about plants passed down from generation to generation.

Don’t miss a single issue of Mother Earth Gardener. Published by the editors of MOTHER EARTH NEWS, Mother Earth Gardener provides decades of organic gardening experience from the most trusted voices in the field. Join today and save off the newsstand price! Get one year (4 issues) for only $24.95! (USA only)




Facebook Pinterest Instagram YouTube


click me