• COOL FLOWERS

    Expert flower grower Lisa Mason Zeigler introduces us to the long-blooming stars of the spring garden, the hardy annuals – those flowers that thrive when they are planted during cool conditions (instead of waiting until the warmth of spring).  Forget “Some Like It Hot,” she advises, and give them a cool start. Plant them in the right spot at the right time, nestle their roots deep into rich organic soil, and stand back. In no time at all, you’ll have a low-maintenance, vibrant spring flower garden that keeps on blooming when other annuals are dead and gone.

    Item: 7368
  • THE HEIRLOOM TOMATO: FROM GARDEN TO TABLE

    From the world-class garden of acclaimed food writer Amy Goldman comes a gorgeously illustrated cookbook and guide to the world's most beautiful and delicious tomatoes.

    Every year, renowned grower Goldman produces 600 varieties of tomatoes on her estate in New York's Hudson Valley. Here, in 56 delicious recipes, 200 gorgeous photos and Goldman's erudite, charming prose, is the cream of the crop.

    From glorious heirloom beefsteaks to that delicious tomato you had as a kid but can't seem to find anymore — and including exotica like the ground tomato (a tiny green fruit that tastes like pineapple and grows in a tomatillo-like husk) — The Heirloom Tomato is filled with gorgeous shots of tomatoes.

    Along with the recipes and photos are profiles of the tomatoes, filled with surprisingly fascinating facts on their history and provenance, and a master gardener's guide to growing your own. More than just a loving look at one of the world's great edibles, this is a philosophy of eating and conservation between covers, an irresistible book for anyone who loves to cook or to garden.

    Item: 4431
  • THE BEGINNER'S GUIDE TO BEEKEEPING

    Beginning with the basics, seasoned beekeepers Daniel and Samantha Johnson answer all of a prospective beekeeper's questions on how to set up, care for, and harvest your very own bee colonies. With the help of this comprehensive DIY guide, raising bees can be an enjoyable and accessible backyard pastime for gardeners, crafters and cooks everywhere.

    Item: 6895
  • THE HONEY CONNOISSEUR

    The book goes on to give a thorough course in the origins of more than 30 different honeys as well as step-by-step instructions on how to taste honey, describe its flavor and determine what other flavors will pair best with it. Also included are simple recipes such as dressings, marinades, beverages and quick-and-easy desserts.

    Item: 6731
  • THE BEEKEEPER'S BIBLE

    Detailed instructions for making candles, furniture polish, beauty products and nearly 100 honey-themed recipes are included. Fully illustrated with how-to photography and unique etchings, The Beekeeper's Bible will provide any backyard enthusiast or gardener with the confidence to dive into beekeeping (or simply daydream about harvesting their own honey while relaxing in the comfort of an armchair).

    Item: 6816
  • GOAT: MEAT, MILK, CHEESE

    Goat is a no-holds-barred goatapedia, laugh-out-loud cooking class, cheesemaking workshop, and dairy-milking expedition all in one. And while goat is the world's primary meat (upwards of 70 percent of the red meat eaten around the world is goat) never before has there been a cookbook on this topic in the United States.

    Item: 6817
  • TEXAS GARDENING THE NATURAL WAY

    Compost your old "complete" gardening guide. There's a new way of gardening in Texas that's healthier for people and the environment, more effective at growing vigorous plants and reducing pests, cheaper to maintain, and just more fun. It's Howard Garrett's "The Natural Way" organic gardening program, and it's all here in Texas Gardening the Natural Way.

    This book is the first complete, state-of-the-art organic gardening handbook for Texas. Using Garrett's mainstream gardening techniques, this book presents a total gardening program:

    • How to plan, plant, and maintain beautiful landscapes without using chemical fertilizers and toxic pesticides.
    • Gardening fundamentals: soils, landscape design, planting techniques and maintenance practices.
    • More native and adaptable varieties of garden and landscape plants than any other guide on the market.
    • Trees: 134 species of evergreens, berry- and fruit-bearing, flowering, yellow fall color, orange fall color, and red fall color.
    • Shrubs and specialty plants: 85 species for sun, shade, spring flowering, summer flowering, and treeform shrubs.
    • Ground covers and vines: 51 species for sun and shade.
    • Annuals and perennials: 136 species for fall color, winter color, summer color in shade and sun, and spring color. Also seeding rates for wildflowers.
    • Lawn grasses: 10 species for sun and shade, with additional information on 16 native grasses, seeding rates for 32 grasses, and suggested mowing heights.
    • Fruits, nuts and vegetables: 58 species, with a vegetable planting chart and information on organic pecan and fruit tree growing, fruit varieties for Texas, grape and pecan varieties, and gardening by the moon.
    • Common green manure crops: 29 crops that help enrich the soil.
    • Herbs: 66 species for culinary and medicinal uses.
    • Bugs: 73 types of helpful and harmful bugs, with organic remedies for pests, lists of beneficial bugs and plants that attract them, a beneficial bug release schedule, and sources for beneficial bugs.
    • Plant diseases: organic treatments for 55 common problems.
    • Organic methods for repelling mice, rabbits, armadillos, beavers, cats, squirrels and deer.
    • Organic management practices: watering, fertilizing, controlling weeds, releasing beneficial insects, biological controls (including bats and purple martins), and recipes for Garrett Juice, fire ant control drench, vinegar herbicide, Sick Tree Treatment, and Tree Trunk Goop.
    • Average first and last freeze dates for locations around the state.
    • Organic fertilizers and soil amendments: 61 varieties, including full instructions for making compost.
    • Organic pest control products: 30 varieties.
    • Common house plants and poisonous plants.
    • Instructions for climbing vegetable structures and bat houses.
    • 833 gorgeous full-color photographs.
    Item: 7823
  • QUENCH

    From the author of Handmade Gatherings comes Quench: a book offering more than 100 recipes for soft and hard drinks, including natural sodas, fruit nectars, tisanes, shrubs, kombucha, bitters, liqueurs, wines, infused liquors, party punches, and more.

    Do-it-yourself beverages are gaining interest and intrigue across the culinary spectrum, with folks trying everything from homemade root beer to hard cider, fresh-squeezed ginger lemonade to handcrafted Irish cream. Professional mixologists and amateur home cooks alike are looking for beverages to inspire and satisfy, sourced from a variety of natural and seasonal ingredients. Quench offers the solution, covering the entire beverage range with hot, cold, fermented, infused, and cured offerings. There’s something here for every palate, occasion, and need. Quench promises to help you pour a glass of whatever it is you’re thirsting for.

    Item: 7918
  • FERMENT YOUR VEGETABLES

    Fermented vegetables are a great, healthy addition to anyone's diet. Abundant in probiotics, enzymes, vitamins, minerals, and more, research continues to reveal the many ways that these foods positively contribute to our well-being. From kimchi and sauerkraut to pickles and kvass, fermented foods have been part of the human diet for millennia … and are rightfully reclaiming their place at our daily table.

    The idea of fermenting vegetables at home can be intimidating for those who have never tried it before. The truth is, it's quite easy once you learn just a few basic concepts. In Ferment Your Vegetables, author Amanda Feifer, fermentation expert and founder of phickle.com, serves as your guide, showing you, step by step, how you can create traditional, delicious fermented food at home, using only simple ingredients and a little time. No fancy starters or elaborate equipment required.

    Using only veggies, a few spices and a glass jar, here's just a small sampling of recipes you could start making today:

    • Zucchini Bread Pickles
    • Curried Cauliflower Pickles
    • Pint of Pickled Peppers
    • Simplest Sauerkraut
    • Ginger Beet Kraut
    • Green Bean Kimchi
    • Wild Fermented Tomato Sauce
    • Bullseye Beet Kvass

    Ferment Your Vegetables will make beginners wonder why they didn't start sooner, and give veteran fermenters loads of new ideas and techniques to try at home. All aboard the probiotic train!

    Item: 7837
  • THE HERBFARM COOKBOOK

    Written with passion, humor, and a caring for detail that makes this book quite special, The Herbfarm Cookbook explains everything from how to recognize the herbs in your supermarket to how to infuse a jar of honey with the flavor of fresh lavender. Recipes include a full range of dishes from soups, salads, eggs, pasta and risotto, vegetables, poultry, fish, meats, breads, and desserts to sauces, ice creams, sorbets, chutneys, vinegars, and candied flowers.

    Item: 7890
  • CATTAIL MOONSHINE & MILKWEED MEDICINE

    History, literature, and botany meet in this charming tour of how humans have relied on plants to nourish, shelter, heal, clothe, and even entertain us. Did you know that during World War II, the U.S. Navy paid children to collect milkweed’s fluffy white floss, which was then used as filling for life preservers? And Native Americans in the deserts of the Southwest traditionally crafted tattoo needles from prickly pear cactus spines. These are just two of the dozens of tidbits that Tammi Hartung highlights in the tales of 45 native North American flowers, herbs, and trees that have rescued and delighted us for centuries.

    Item: 8068
  • SEEING SEEDS

    seed than the plant it will someday become: seeds, seedheads, pods, and fruits have their own astounding beauty that rivals, and sometimes even surpasses, the beauty of flowers. In these stunning pages you’ll gain an understanding of how seeds are formed and dispersed, why they look the way they do.you’ll never look at a seed the same way again.

    Item: 7997

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